Monday, August 22, 2016

Paul Buhle on Jews and American Comics: Wednesday, October 26th, 2:30-4pm




Wednesday, October 26th, 2:30-4pm: "Jews and American Comics, with a Strong Personal note" by Dr. Paul Buhle, Brown University.

The presentation will be followed by a discussion. Please email Elizabeth (Biz) Nijdam (enijdam@umich.edu) for reading materials. The event will take place in the 3rd Floor Conference Room of the MLB (Room 3308). Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

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Jews and American Comics, with a Strong Personal note," Paul Buhle's presentation reaches from giants of the funny pages a century ago, Rube Goldberg and Harry Hershfield (not forgetting the Yiddish comic strips of Samuel Zagat and Zuni Maud) to the Jewish-American comic art of today, Art Spiegelman, Peter Kuper, Lauren Weinstein and Joey Perr, and the on line "Bernie Sanders Comics" organized by the speaker. What are the key points of art and narrative, how have they evolved and what is their meaning within the larger world of comic art? Secrets will be (nearly) revealed.



Dale Jacobs on his 1976 Project: Friday, September 23rd, 2:30-4pm




Friday, September 23rd, 2:30-4pm: "The 1976 Project: A Year in Comic Book Publishing" by Dr. Dale Jacobs, English, University of Windsor.

The presentation will be followed by a discussion. Please email Elizabeth (Biz) Nijdam (enijdam@umich.edu) for reading materials. The event will take place in the 3rd Floor Conference Room of the MLB (Room 3308). Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

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The 1976 Project: A Year in Comic Book Publishing

In this presentation, I will describe, in general terms, my current large project – an examination of comic book publishing in 1976. Such an examination exists at the confluence of a number of disciplines. First, the focus on a single year draws on methodologies from book history, notably Sydney Shep’s model of model of production, distribution and consumption that focuses on “the complex dynamic intercrossings between people (prosopography), places (placeography) and objects (bibliography).” The rhetorical nature of Shep’s ideas, combined with the necessity of situating comic book publishers as sponsors of multimodal literacy within such a model, means that this project draws on methodologies and ways of thinking from a variety of fields, including Comics Studies, Rhetoric and Composition, Literacy Studies, and Book History.

By focusing on a single year, I endeavor to show how and why it is important to examine the history of comics and the literacies surrounding that history in ways that go beyond the creation of a canon of great works in comics, and why using a diverse set of methodologies is crucial in such an examination. This presentation will give a glimpse into some of the research and thinking I have done to this point, both in terms of specifics from 1976 and the larger methodological and interdisciplinary implications outlined above.